An Open Letter to the Porn Industry: A touch of reality About Measure B

MILTON CARRERO (@MiltonDCarrero) describes himself as a journalist, singer/songwriter and Yoga Instructor. The son of a physician and medical scholar, he was exposed to health theories since before he was born. He survived cancer at the age of 23, which awoke his interests in nutrition, meditation and alternative forms of medicine. He grew up in Puerto Rico and is married to a Lehigh Valley native. He has two children, a daughter and a son. He writes the following on the Allentown Morning Call’s blogs.mcall.com site

Dear porn producers,

I noticed that your colleagues at Vivid, one of the nation’s most prominent adult film makers, filed a lawsuit today to overturn the newly passed measure requiring porn performers in Los Angeles to wear condoms when they film. Their claim: “the ordinance imposes an intolerable burden on the exercise of rights under the First Amendment.”

I’m the first one to defend our constitutional rights because I understand that the first amendment is there precisely to protect those unpopular voices that would not be heard otherwise. I would think 20 times before I wrote something that would go against our society’s free flow of ideas.

But I would argue that the porn industry already enjoys ample protection from the first amendment. This is why a lot of its content is easily accessible. But if you want to sell it as real, you need to subscribe to a dose of reality.

I don’t mean toning down the fiction what currently passes as sex in your movies. I mean actually dealing with the risks of your profession. Construction workers wear helmets, nurses who deal with bodily fluids wear gloves and professional porn actors should wear condoms—morality and politics aside.

Supporters of the ordinance have suggested directors digitally remove images of condoms from their films. Producers say the cost of altering the sex scenes would be prohibitive. I say tough luck.

Adult films have dictated sexual practices worldwide for generations. What porn directors choose to present in their movies eventually morphs into the unwritten script for sex in people’s bedrooms. And most teenagers obtain their first glimpses of sexuality through the adult film industry. They aspire to put what they see into practice, except that even the most novice teenager carries a condom with them just in case.

The directors’ rationale for promoting unprotected sex is as clumsy as keeping condoms in your wallet. Unlike the characters in your films, the actors do have to live with the consequences of their stunts.

Let’s face it, every profession has its risks. You’ve been telling your viewers how to have sex for years, it’s about time somebody forced you to do the most sensitive thing.

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