XXX Wasteland Interviews Jill C. Nelson Author of “Golden Goddesses”

Check out our advertisers www.risingstarpr.com www.auditionporn.com/tour1, www.eruptionxl.com www.sexucrave.com and www.vantagedist.com/page/manufacturers/id/1895/manufacturer/Brandxxx_Pictures.html; www.galaxypublicity.com

Follow Gene Ross at twitter@GeneRoss3; Follow AdultFYI at twitter@Adultfyi1

Adam Wilcox posts on www.xxxwasteland.wordpress.com – Fans of adult starlets of yesteryear look no further than Jill C. Nelson’s latest book, Golden Goddesses: 25 Legendary Women of Classic Erotic Cinema, 1968-1985, for a comprehensive documentation of their favorite performers from porn’s “Golden Era.”

Nelson, who earned adult industry historian status by co-authoring 2008’s John Holmes: A Life Measured in Inches along with Jennifer Sugar, provides readers with an equally in-depth look at the lives and careers of erotic actresses from the late-60s to mid-1980s time period with Goddesses, a 946-page tome written over the course of three-and-a-half years.

Nelson’s high regard for her interview subjects is clear and unmistakable within the pages of Goddesses, offering readers a refreshing presentation of the ladies’ personal lives as well as their impact on the world of adult entertainment.

Among the ladies profiled in Goddesses are Marilyn Chambers, Julia St. Vincent, Amber Lynn, Nina Hartley, Veronica Hart, Christy Canyon, Georgina Spelvin, Gloria Leonard, Rhonda Jo Petty, Ginger Lynn and many others.

Jill kindly spoke with XXX Wasteland on the afternoon of February 19 to discuss the conception and creation of Goddesses, the book’s highly publicized launch party this past November in California, a possible future project pertaining to the adult industry and more.

You can visit the official Golden Goddesses blog at this link and follow Jill on Twitter under the handle @HolmesInches.

Q: As many people are aware, you co-authored the Inches biography on John Holmes several years ago along with Jennifer Sugar. Can you tell us how the idea for Golden Goddesses came about?

Yeah. I remember Jennifer – who actually initiated A Life Measured in Inches – and I, we were in Las Vegas to promote the book. It was probably about six months after we finished the book and I got thinking that there is just this wealth of information that the women we had talked to for Inches, I just knew there was a wealth of information to tap into.

And I thought it would be really interesting to get their stories because I know that several of them have been interviewed over the years and so on, but I don’t think really recently and not as in-depth as I thought they should have been interviewed. And that is sort of what my idea was – to allow them to share their stories, from the childhood years, throughout their careers and up until the point of what they are doing today.

Q: Two key differences between Inches and Goddesses are a) You wrote the new book yourself and b) Goddesses focuses on the lives and careers of 25 performers – more, actually, if you take into account the “Honorable Mentions” section – rather than profiling one individual as with the Holmes bio. Can you talk about the differences in regard to those two aspects?

That’s a good question, Adam. (Laughs) Both books had elements that were difficult or challenging and both books, I guess you would say, had easier elements. In a way, it was easier doing Inches just because we were focusing on one individual. So, everybody that we talked to only had to give us information about John and we really only had to dig up information on one individual and watch movies on only one individual.

But on the other hand, when you are doing a book on one person and trying to make it as informative and in-depth as you possibly can, you really want to do a lot of digging.

And I know we did – we obviously did. But Goddesses was tricky because you are trying to do 25 mini-biographies and still you want to make it enjoyable, you hope that you are revealing some new information, and again, you want to treat the subject with a great level of respect – especially when you are writing about a subject that is so taboo. I think then you really have to kind of … not go out of your way, but you really have to take care to present your subjects respectfully if you want to do a book that is worth reading. In both cases, we could have sensationalized these people and we chose not to.

But there are pros and cons. It’s kind of nice to do a book about 25 people because you know that you can’t go into the kind of depth that you can with one. But on the other hand, it’s harder, like I just said, because you’re trying to condense a lot of information into what you hope is sort of a readable mini-bio.

Q: And as you said, the profiles would probably be classified as mini-bios, but they are pretty comprehensive. I wouldn’t consider them “small” profiles, especially considering there are 25 of them contained in one book.

Well, I’m glad you say that because I don’t think they are, either. Obviously, some chapters are longer than others because, say, for Ginger Lynn, we had three (interview) sessions. And Amber as well – Amber Lynn. I don’t know why it was.

It’s just that they just had a lot to share and they wanted to use this opportunity to really be able to tell all, so to speak, whereas I guess Jody Maxwell’s chapter is relatively small, (as is) Laurie Holmes’, Kitten Natividad. Laurie has been interviewed a lot in the past, mostly about John. So, I thought it was a really good opportunity for her to be able to talk about herself and her own career. But again, because she had been interviewed a lot, she didn’t feel a need to go on and on.

But I kind of just let them lead the way and when we started opening up the conversation, I let them take me to where they wanted to go. I had a set list of questions, but I still let them take me where they wanted to go, which is why the chapters are varying lengths.

Q: You wrote Goddesses over the course of three years, is that right?

Yeah. Really, from start to finish, it was about three-and-a-half years.

Q: Obviously, during that time, you travelled extensively to conduct interviews in addition to all the research – film viewing and reading up on interviewees – and then the actual writing and structuring of the book. Throughout that entire process, are there any experiences that stand out in your mind?

Yeah. Actually, there are a few. I should say that really, I only interviewed Seka in person. I did go to Montreal – she happened to be coming to Montreal with her husband, who was going to be there on business – and because we don’t live very far away, I went and interviewed her in person.

But what I ended up doing was I interviewed everybody and then I made trips – to California a couple of times and New York – to meet some of the women after the fact because I wanted to be able to include a personal experience with as many of the ladies as I could. So, I didn’t necessarily interview them in person, but I at least did get to meet most of them – I would say 20 of them – after the fact or even throughout the course of working on Inches.

One of the real fun things: my girlfriend and I went to New York in June to visit her son, who lives in Brooklyn. I had not yet met Gloria Leonard or Candida Royalle before and I really wanted to because I had already written their chapters and I had interviewed Candida for A Life Measured in Inches as well.

I’d had an ongoing conversation with her for about five years and I wanted to meet them. As you noticed in the book, Gloria was going to be in town from Hawaii the same week and it just turned out that a friend of theirs, Veronica Vera – who is a friend of Annie Sprinkle’s and worked in porn for a little bit and is an activist – they were going to have a reunion because Veronica was getting married and it just happened that it was going to be the same weekend that I was going (to New York) with my girlfriend.

I really didn’t plan it to be that weekend. Candida said, “We’re going to be meeting up on the Sunday. A friend of mine has this little boat in the marina” – West 49th Street, I think it was, in Manhattan. We met up and we just had an absolute ball. We were only there for a couple of hours, but Gloria is just outrageous and so funny. They are just a riot.

We just missed Veronica Hart by about an hour; she was coming later. We just had such a great time; we had a little bit of wine and fruit and veggies. There were, I think, seven or eight of us on the boat and it was like I’d known them for years. It was just so much fun. And my girlfriend – she works as a nurse and has had no exposure to this at all except for the fact that she knows me and I’ve written these two books – she and her daughter-in-law just had a blast, too. It was really great and it was a beautiful day. It was in June and here we were. I thought, “Here I am with these ladies and they are just so incredible.” It was just lots of fun. That just stands out for me.

Also, meeting Roberta Findlay was really a trip. I’m pretty sure you are familiar with Roberta’s films. She has a reputation for being somewhat of a recluse. She really isn’t, but the thing is, she just doesn’t really embrace her past in porn.

So, some people might interpret that as being that she is reclusive, whereas she just doesn’t really get off on talking about it like some of the other people I interviewed – they enjoy their careers and they kind of embrace it and they revere some of the people in the industry, where Roberta has really moved on and she’s very involved in the recording industry in New York, which is equally as fascinating.

My husband and I went – this was a different trip to New York and I had already interviewed her, but I wanted to meet her in person – and she was just so self-deprecating and very witty, very dry, but I thought, “I can see how people would take her the wrong way.” If you don’t “get” her, you are looking for something she really is not. She is not what people conjure up in their mind. She is just very different and very down-to-Earth and very Roberta Findlay.

But I really enjoyed her. She took us on a tour of the studio and I mentioned Sting had been there the day before. But it was just so fascinating talking to her. I actually called her a couple of weeks ago and I said, “The book is out now. I’m sorry I haven’t sent you a copy yet, but I’m going to be sending it to you.” So, I’m going to be calling her next week just to see. She did read her chapter – the interview before the book was published – but I’m really interested to see what she will have to say about it.

Rhonda Jo Petty, too – I visited her at her ranch. She is just so down-to-Earth as well and she is just so unpretentious – that is what really strikes me about Rhonda. She’s just a wonderful person. She’s had a lot of demons to battle and continues to battle. But you just cannot help but love her. She’s just a terrific girl.

Q: Yeah. I remember way back before the book was released you posted a preview of her profile – I’m not sure if hers was the first you put up, but I think it was one of them – and even just reading that was pretty powerful.

Yeah. And I’m sure when you were reading through the whole chapter, then you really get the true picture – the whole picture.

Q: Yes.

She’s been through a lot. These ladies have been through a lot of stuff and come up on the other end. They don’t denigrate the industry. Laurie has had a lot of things to say about the industry – she said to me just a couple of weeks ago, “I hope I didn’t come across as too harsh.” I said, “You have a right to say what your experience is and don’t worry about it.” And I think that’s okay, I think that’s perfectly fine.

Q: And I think much of Laurie’s criticism of the business goes way back to when her husband, John Holmes, was dying of AIDS and she felt many people in the industry did not support him.

It does. It goes back to that and that’s really where it all started. Plus, she’s grown up a lot over the years. She said to me recently, “Sometimes I just wish that I had gone to university, met a really nice guy and gotten married.” She said, “I think about that more and more now.” She’s going to be 50 this year and although she’s happy in her life, you cannot help but be retrospective about your life even if you are not in the industry.

Q: Right. Going back to Roberta Findlay for a second, that was actually one of my favorite chapters reading about how involved she is with her studio – in Manhattan, I believe?

Yeah.

Q: There are many famous artists who record there regularly. It was very interesting.

Yes. That was just incredible. I remember her saying to us, “I don’t even know who half of these people are.” She sort of said, “As long as they pay the bills.” (Laughs) But she respects them and they respect her. Yoko Ono – who does record there quite frequently – she absolutely adored Walter (Sear), who started the studio. Roberta said because of that, sort of by osmosis, Yoko now tolerates her. (Laughs) It’s funny.

Q: Yeah. The official book launch was this past November at Hustler Hollywood in California, is that right?

Yes.

Q: It was well-covered by the media and adult industry news outlets and attended by not only many of the Goddesses interviewees, but also other members of the business. I was wondering if you could talk about that evening because I’m sure it was a pretty amazing night.

It was. It was an absolutely amazing evening and far exceeded anything we ever expected or anticipated. Even though I know how popular these women are – they all have their following and fans – I realized that night when you assemble fifteen or sixteen of them together for one evening, you are going to have a powerhouse of a turnout. And it really was. They were supporting me as much as I was supporting them and all of the fans and press were supporting all of us.

It was quite an overwhelming moment to stand there at the mic. All I did was read my introduction because it was too much of a crazy house to try and read excerpts, but they are all sitting and their eyes are all up at me as I’m standing there reading. It was just so weird. (Laughs)

It was a really ironic and profound experience for me because (the ladies profiled) sort of got their … I would say just rewards or just desserts. I really felt like things had come full-circle for them. They were being honored and recognized in a very respectful way, a very classy location – the Hustler store really is a beautiful location – and we had, of course, cake and champagne and they were being interviewed throughout the evening and the fans just came out in droves.

The next night when we did the smaller event at Larry Edmunds – which (the interviewees) really liked because they liked the fact that they were at an “authentic” book store – we had a panel set up that evening and there were ten of them there. That was really great because we had a fabulous Q & A, they again got to interact and people just had love in their eyes for these ladies. It just amazed me.

Q: It’s always nice to see adult performers held in that kind of regard.

It is. And like I said – and I may have mentioned this on Facebook or in another interview – we’re not saying that they’ve found a cure for cancer or they’ve won a Nobel Peace Prize or anything like that, but in their own way, they are essential and they are significant to their genre and to their era because they were renegades and they were doing this when it was illegal.

And despite what a lot of people think, they made their decision to do this – they were forward-thinking. It wasn’t like somebody was bullying them into it. I really don’t believe they were exploited. There might be times when they were exploited, but what really bothers me about that – and I have to say this, Adam, because this always irks me – is for people to say that these women are exploited, or even the men, which they don’t tend to do; it’s usually the women who (critics say) are exploited.

It’s sort of like saying these people don’t have a brain and that they don’t have the ability to make their own decisions. It drives me insane. You meet these people or read this book and tell me they are exploited.

Q: I feel the exact same way. I’ve used the phrase before: “The term ‘degrading to women’ is degrading to women.”

Yeah – I love that. That is very aptly put.

Q: It implies that men are capable of making their own decisions, but women aren’t.

Right. And nobody ever turns around and says the men are degraded. Well, why? And I think I made that point in my book at some point. I thought, “I need to get this out somewhere.” I didn’t want to dwell on it, but I did make a point how there is never any concern given for the men. It’s always the women. And I thought, “Why?” (Laughs) What’s good for the goose should be good for the gander. If you are concerned about the women, then be concerned about the men.

Q: When you pick up Goddesses as a reader rather than the author and have a look at the book, do you have a particular favorite profile?

I was asked this once before and it’s really hard because – and this term is used a lot – a book is like your baby. And it’s like they are 25 little babies because I nursed each one of these little chapters along. I don’t know if I have a favorite, but if I look at the back of the book and I see the faces, I sort of smile because I can remember the interviews and what the experience was like of interviewing a specific person. So, it brings back really fond memories. If I flip through the book randomly and I see a quote, I can remember the way it was said.

Barbara Mills – who doesn’t get a lot of play because she started her career earlier than a lot of these women – she was a sexploitation actress and then she got out of the industry in the early-70s. I really enjoyed talking with her because she’s really the quintessential hippie. And she died six months after I interviewed her, which was really sad, of hepatitis C. I don’t know if you knew this, but Carly, her daughter, she came out both nights (the book launch and Edmunds event) and joined the panel of women the second night, which was so great.

You probably would have to be a diehard fan to have heard of Barbara Caron Mills, but Bob Chinn hired her a lot in the early years. When the heat was on in L.A. and he would sort of switch and do softcore for a while, Barbara would work for him. She had some acting chops and she was really stunningly beautiful. I have a little bit of an affinity for that (chapter), I guess because she died shortly after our interview.

The same with Marilyn Chambers. I had interviewed her for Inches, so that interview is from that book. Material was used for Goddesses that we didn’t use in Inches because we only used the portion where she talked about John in Inches. But I’m so glad that I interviewed her, especially when she passed away in 2009 before I even started this book.

That is one of my favorite chapters, I would have to say, because I can remember our discussion. It was a hot summer day in July and I called her. For probably the first 20 minutes, we just talked about her daughter, McKenna. McKenna wasn’t able to come to the launch, unfortunately, but Marilyn’s best friend and husband came, who are also the godmother and godfather of McKenna. So, that was really great.

Juliet Anderson, of course, passed away after I interviewed her as well. I think it was four months after. So, it was really interesting talking with these ladies and having the chance to speak to them before they passed on. I might have even conducted some of the final interviews with them.

But I love all the chapters. Julia St. Vincent is a good friend of mine, as is Laurie. I got to know both of them through the first book. I don’t know if you remember Julia’s chapter very well – it was “From Exhausted to Boogie Nights” – but she didn’t really think she should have been in the book.

And I said, “You made the very first porn documentary that I can think of. And also, because of its significance, and becoming the inspiration for Boogie Nights, I really think it’s important that you are included in the book.” And when I read through her chapter, I chuckle because I know her so well and her sense of humor. She’s just a very boisterous, funny person.

So, yeah – I can go through the chapters and tell you reasons why I have favorite moments.

Q: One thing that sort of crossed my mind when I was reading the book is how we as a society tend to think of the decades of yesteryear as being more conservative and less tolerant than modern times. But one thing I noticed in Goddesses was the number of rape scenes featured in adult films of that period. I think if content like that was released today it would be highly controversial, but it appeared to be pretty prevalent back then.

You’re right. I think that’s true. I think what they’ve done is … yeah, it’s legal, but still, there are a lot of restrictions now. Restrictions weren’t enforced (during the Golden Era) because (making porn) was illegal. It’s really a gray area to me, still. But they would have these rape scenes and these fisting scenes, but then the theatres would get busted. So, they would put them in on purpose to guarantee that they would get publicity for their films, which is why Rhonda went into hiding for two years – because of the fisting scenes and then the publicity that resulted from the film.

I agree with you, Adam. I don’t watch porn – I don’t watch modern-day. I watched it to do these books and I enjoyed a lot of the films, but I did review a couple of contemporary films in Raven Touchstone’s chapter. What struck me is how clinical it all seems to be. It seems to lack emotion. I don’t know if that’s really true, but that’s just the impression I got when I was watching the few pictures I did see that are made today.

I guess, like you say, there are a lot of things they can’t do. I remember even when we were working on the Holmes book, one of the loops that John made in the early-70s was called Big John and the Girl Scouts. Mark Novick – the company, I think was called Pretty Girl … Claudia Grayson did a lot of loops, if you are familiar with her name – Linda McDowell, she is one of (the book’s) “Honorable Mentions.”

Mark’s father’s company shot a lot of loops. Big John and the Girl Scouts, there is no way that would even get made today. (Laughs) Just the title alone. If you see it – and we reviewed it for Inches – two girls come to the door and they’re selling John Girl Scout cookies. One of them was played by one of his girlfriends, Gilda Grant. She was obviously 18 at the time, but they look so young. I mean, they look like they are about 14 years old. So, that kind of thing, you would never see that today. I think they probably do have some restrictions. I don’t think (women in adult films) can appear to be high school age or anything like that now, could they?

Q: Well, there are schoolgirl-based plots today, but there are no actual titles that I’m aware of such as Big John and the Girl Scouts. (Laughs)

Yeah, that just conjures up all kinds of … (Laughs) political correctness. Good or bad, it’s there.

Q: Obviously, when writing the Holmes book, you were immersed in the adult industry and got to know many people in the business. Having researched the lives of the ladies profiled in Goddesses, do you feel you learned anything new about the industry?

I would say the one thing that really comes through is that a lot of them told me – and it’s in their chapters – a lot of them are not financially stable.

That’s the one thing that I think really became prevalent to me. When they worked, they didn’t ask for residuals. And it’s not only in the adult industry because it’s in the entire entertainment industry at that time, I think. That’s one thing that really struck me. The women who came along in the 80s and later – Ginger (Lynn), Christy (Canyon) and Nina Hartley – I think they are a little more solvent financially.

But the ladies like Candida and Gloria … I think Annie is doing okay. But I think it’s just been a real struggle for them financially. And that’s sad to me because they really risked themselves – their reputation and their family’s reputation and all of that – and what do they have to show for it? They are legends and that’s terrific and wonderful, but I wish that they had something more to show for it financially.

Some of it is their own fault, I guess – they may have squandered money – but I don’t believe that’s really the case. I think it’s just the fact that they were paid well for the time, but if you compare it to mainstream Hollywood, it was really a pittance what they were paid.

Q: Yeah. I also don’t know if there was as much money in it back then, especially with it being illegal, although I don’t know if that would make any difference.

I think there was. I guess it goes right down the line with the producers and directors. But there were people lining their pockets. The people who owned the production companies were certainly doing okay. But I guess that’s the one thing when you ask that question that really comes into my head.

Q: Yeah. I guess legalities don’t really matter when it comes to making money. There are plenty of illegal operations that are quite lucrative. (Laughs)

For sure, for sure.

Q: I find it refreshing that if somebody were to pick up a copy of Goddesses and read only the introduction, the regard you have for not only your interview subjects, but also the adult industry as a whole comes across very clearly. I think it’s nice when anyone can open their mind in that way, but especially someone such as yourself who is outside the porn business and somebody who I suppose most people wouldn’t expect to write about subject matter like this.

Thank you. I think it’s just because, like you said earlier, I had gotten to know these people. In the beginning – and I know I was asked this when I was working on the Holmes book – “What are these people like?” I was probably a little leery.

I’m sure I was a little bit tentative about getting my feet wet, so to speak. But when I got to know them – and some of them, as I said, became close friends – these women have really opened up to me and I’ve really learned who they are as people and it’s very hard to just look at them as being … I use the word “depraved” because I think that’s how society looks at these people – as sort of being depraved and being where we don’t want our children to associate with them.

A couple of them have taught. I think Jane (Hamilton) mentioned it in her chapter that when she was supply teaching in New York she was just terrified that somebody was going to find out.

Jody Maxwell, the same. She does supply teaching. She has given her legal name and so far she has been fine, but there is always that fear. I can’t imagine living that way and I always say this: We like to think we are very liberated as a society, but we really aren’t. I think Seka hit the nail on the head – she said, “They don’t mind if you are fraternizing in their bars as patrons and so on, but they don’t want you working for them.” I think that’s really true.

Q: I agree. There is an industry writer named Gene Ross who runs a website called AdultFYI and he likes to poke fun at the fact that porn often considers itself accepted by the mainstream – which I personally feel it should be, but I don’t think really is, unfortunately – with headlines such as, “From the ‘Mainstream Loves Us Department’ – Another Teacher Fired After Porn Past Outed” or something along those lines. (Laughs)

Oh, I know. I remember that.

Q: There have actually been quite a few of those cases in recent months.

I know! And what is really ironic and contradictory about it is that the trilogy Fifty Shades of Grey … I haven’t read it – I started twenty pages into one of the books and I thought, “I don’t know about this.” I didn’t think it was very well written, first of all. But I thought, “There’s the hypocrisy right there – the fact that you’ve got people probably trampling over one another to get Fifty Shades of Grey when it was first released, yet they are the same people who are probably saying that people who work in the porn industry are whatever they want to call it.” I don’t understand that.

Q: That crossed my mind as well when I heard about the popularity of the series.

I guess it was written in a way that made it “safe” for women to embrace their sexuality or whatever. But still – it is a hypocrisy. It’s funny: the girl who cuts my hair, I mentioned that to her because she said she had read it. I said, “Isn’t it about S & M?” (Laughs) And her eyes went wide. She said, “You’re the first person who has actually come out and said that.” I said, “Well, that’s the impression I’ve gotten from people.” It was just really funny. I said it and she was like, “Oh, yeah – it is.” It was almost as if she was afraid to acknowledge that. She knew she could say it to me because I’ve written these two books. (Laughs)

Q: (Laughs) Do you have any upcoming projects in the works that you would like to put out there?

Well, I don’t have anything right now. I’ve had a couple of people say to me that they hope I’ll do a follow-up in the same genre or interview more women. And I never say never. I don’t know if I’m going to do this, but I am considering writing sort of an equivalent about the men.

Q: Oh, wow.

Yeah. I don’t know for sure. I go with my gut and I said when I wrote this book that I wasn’t going to write another book on this subject just because I felt I had said everything I felt I could say. But when we were down in L.A., Rich Pacheco and Jon Martin were there and Joel Sussman – who took a lot of the beautiful photos in the book – and Kenji and Bill Margold and Cass Paley. They said to me, “Why don’t you write a book about the men?” I said, “Well …” Doing the Holmes book, you kind of feel like you’ve covered all the bases because, as Bill says, “He’s the king.”

Q: Right.

But then I thought, “It would be kind of interesting to find out how the men got into (the adult industry) during that time.” Kind of learn their stories and see what they have to say. So, it’s something that I’m considering.

Q: Very cool. And that would be of the Golden Era as well?

It would be, yeah. It would cover sort of the same time period. I would love to talk to the people who knew Jamie Gillis. Actually, I did interview Jamie for Inches and I have to go back and look at our interview because I’m sure he said some things that, if I were to do a project like that, I could use. He probably did say a few things about himself that would be interesting to kind of use as a starting point.

And John Leslie and Ron Jeremy .. it would be really interesting to talk to some of these people. But I would like to cover photographers, too, like Joel and Kenji and maybe some directors.

I’m the same way – I like to go full-circle as well and speak with agents, photographers, directors and executives. Performers are great to interview as well, but there are contributors behind the camera who have interesting stories also.

I think so. That’s why I wanted to include directors in Goddesses – because I thought it would be so interesting to talk to Roberta. And Ann Perry – because Ann was one of the early pioneers of making her own films as a woman and didn’t care what anyone told her. She was going to do her own thing – I just love that.

And Julia St. Vincent. And, of course, Raven Touchstone being a screenwriter. I just thought it would be really neat to include the other aspects of the work that the women did in the industry.

Q: Absolutely. And (the men of the Golden Era book) sounds like it would be very interesting.

I don’t know for certain. I’m not starting anything at the moment, but probably in the fall I’ll be itching to start another book. One of the things – as you know as a writer, too – when you take on a project, you have to go full-bore. So, I really do need a break between the two books because I did them back-to-back and it was a lot of work.

Q: Oh, wow. I didn’t know that you did one book right after the other.

Yeah. Well, there was a year before I started working on Goddesses, but all that time we were promoting Inches pretty heavily, so it was like there wasn’t a break. And this idea was percolating the whole time, too, to do Goddesses.

(Inches) was a four-year project. So, it took four years to do a book on one man and it took three-and-a-half years to do Goddesses. (Laughs)

Well, no, because they were min-bios. So, that’s not really true. But (books) are a lot of work. When I wasn’t at work – because I work three days a week – I was working on Goddesses.

Q: To finish up, is there anything you wish to say to readers?

As I always say, I hope people enjoy the book. If people do read the book and they would like to write a short review, it’s always nice if people want to post a few words up on Amazon. You don’t have to have bought the book there, but you do have to have an Amazon account in order to write a review there.

I just really hope that people respect the ladies and see them for who they really are. And I should say that I’m planning to go to the Exxxotica show in Atlantic City in April.

I think Bill Margold is going to be there, so we’ll hopefully be sharing a booth. I went to the Exxxtasy show in Chicago a couple of summers ago for Inches and that was really great. I’m hoping that the Exxxotica show will be equally as good. I don’t know if I’ll have any of the ladies with me just because most of them live in the L.A. area, which is why we did the launch there. But you never know.

The book will be featured in Hamilton magazine in May, which is nice. I like there to be some Canadian exposure. And I really appreciate you, Adam, taking the time to do the interview. And there is a fellow in Montreal who is going to be reviewing the book, Mark Penny. So, it’s nice to have the Canadian-supporting coverage being a Canadian author.

I know the book is a hefty price – the paperback is $49.95 – but the Kindle version is $14.95 and you don’t need an e-reader to read the book. You can have it sent to your computer to be an e-book. A lot of people think they have to have an actual device to do it, but they don’t. I think, actually, Amazon explains on any books page on their site how you can go about doing that for Android and iPads, PCs and everything. A $50.00 price tag is a bit scary, but then the book is 950 pages. (Laughs)

Q: Right. It was great speaking with you again, Jill, and I appreciate you taking some time out today for this interview. Take care and I wish you continued success with Goddesses.

Thanks so much, Adam. Fabulous. Enjoy the rest of your day.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*